PAW-WORTHY BLOGS

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Custom Boot for Homer, the Desert Tortoise

Nov, 18

At 75+ years old, Homer, the California Desert Tortoise, is by far Thera-Paw's oldest "customer".  Homer is Daryl Goldstein's tortoise, and Daryl has owned him for over 35 years.   Homer's foot problems "started two years ago when I decided to change from using hay to reptile bark as hibernation bedding for my three California Desert Tortoises" said Daryl.  "Reptile bark was...

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Paw Problems (Part 1 of 4): Paw Pad Injuries, Cracked Pads, Paw Licking

Mar, 17

If you have a dog, then download, print, file this article.  Why? Because chances are high that your dog will injure their paw at some point and when that happens, here's what you need to know. Why are paws so important?  Because dogs use them for almost everything: to get around - Walk, run, jump.  Paw pads provide traction on slippery surfaces and steer pups...

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Anti-Dragging Gadgets for Hind Paws: VITAL VET REVIEW

Jun, 16

Vital Vet's Product Wizard did the research and sourced the best protection and anti-dragging gadgets for hind paws.  Here's what they have to say and their picks. There are many conditions that can cause a dog to knuckle or drag their back paws.  Some of these include degenerative myelopathy (DM), sciatic nerve injury, disc disease, spinal cord injury, cancer, and fibrocartilaginous embolism (FCE, stroke).  Painful arthritis...

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GET A GRIP: Keeping Seniors, Injured, and Weak Dogs Safe at Home

Feb, 15

Older dogs and those with injuries or balance issues can have trouble moving around the home, especially on slippery surfaces like tile or wood floors.  Some dogs react to slippery floors by not wanting to get up or walk - they lack confidence and will elect to "stay put" rather than risk slipping.  Pets that are nervous about moving around can become weak because they...

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Great Trick for Using Pawz for Anti-Slip

Feb, 01

Dog Boots The trouble with using dog boots to provide indoor traction is that a dog's paw is essentially round, and booties (or anything that is not really snug and form-fitting) tends to spin on the dog's paws.  Then, you end up having the "traction" tread material on the top of the foot and the slick non-treaded material at the bottom of the...

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