Vital Feed

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THE DOG'S KNEE-Treatment Options: Part 4 of 6 in a Series

Sep, 20

PART 4 - TREATMENT OPTIONS There are both medical and surgical treatment options for patients suffering from cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR). Medical management is sometimes considered to be more conservative than surgical treatment. It is important to understand, however, that medical management for CCLR in dogs can be very extensive and expensive.  The choice to pursue surgical management may be...

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THE DOG'S KNEE: Part 2 of 6 in a Series

Sep, 14

ABOUT ACL AND CCL INJURIES - PART 2 The cranial cruciate ligament (CCL), equivalent to the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL in people, is responsible for limiting hyperextension of the stifle (knee), limiting internal rotation of the tibia in relation to the femur, and to prevent forward sliding/drawer motion of the tibia in relation to the femur. Cranial cruciate ligament...

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Help Painful, Weak Dogs Get Moving Again: Leda's Story

May, 09

This awesome article was sent to us by Jeff VerHoef of Canine Mobility who worked with "Leda" the Bouvier. He was interviewed by Kate Poss, the founder and writer for This is Whidbey.  We've talked about how physical therapy, massage, braces, and anti-knuckling devices can help dogs regain mobility.  Now read Leda's story about overcoming severe arthritis and spinal stroke (FCE).  It may "take a...

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Double TPLO Surgery for Dogs

Apr, 08

How a fit, young Newfoundland injured both knees and had two TPLO surgeries at once - with great success. At just eight months old, Sirius, my Newfoundland, partially tore the cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) in her right knee. It was a shock to me, as she came from an excellent breeder, and because my partner and I had been very...

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GET A GRIP: Keeping Seniors, Injured, and Weak Dogs Safe at Home

Feb, 15

Older dogs and those with injuries or balance issues can have trouble moving around the home, especially on slippery surfaces like tile or wood floors.  Some dogs react to slippery floors by not wanting to get up or walk - they lack confidence and will elect to "stay put" rather than risk slipping.  Pets that are nervous about moving around can become even weaker by...

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